The thick skin of the Fuji apple is light red with a yellow blush, and is oftentimes lined with red vertical stripes. The Fuji’s interior creamy white flesh is dense, juicy, and crisp. Low in acid, the flavor is mild yet very sweet with hints of both honey and citrus.

Fujis were first developed in Japan. Some say their name was given to them as homage to Japan’s most sacred mountain, Mount Fuji, but it is more likely they were named after Fujisaki, the location of the research center where they were developed.

Fuji apples contain Vitamins A and C, as well trace amounts of folate and potassium. They are a good source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which has been shown to help prevent heart disease and promote healthy digestion. A medium-sized Fuji apple contains about 80 calories and is high in both water and sugar.

The thick skin and dense flesh of the Fuji apple holds up extremely well when cooked. Fuji apples can be roasted, baked, sautéed and boiled down into sauce. Add slices atop pizza or layer inside a quiche, or chop and slow cook chunks of Fuji apple to make jams, soups, and compotes. Their sweet flavor holds up when cooked as well; try added to baked desserts such as strudels and crisps. This sweet apple pairs well with sharp cheeses, such as sharp cheddar. Fujis store very well under proper cold, dry conditions.

Fuji apples were first developed in the 1930s at the Tohoku Research Station in Morioka, Japan. They quickly became one of the most commonly grown apple varieties in Japan. They grow well in warmer climates suitable for apples. Our favourites come from an orchard in South Australia!

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